What's on the Menu? Things in Your Kitchen Your Dog Can and Cannot Eat

What's on the Menu? Things in Your Kitchen Your Dog Can and Cannot Eat

Is your pup always eyeing the kitchen counter when you’re slicing up a yummy fruit or veggie? Or maybe you’ve noticed some sniffing action happening whenever you’ve tossed your popcorn in the microwave for a Netflix binge-kind-of-night. We know you love your pet, and everyone always says sharing is caring.

However, it’s best to be safe and know what kinds of snacks your dog can actually eat. 

Don’t worry! We’ve done the research for you and compiled a list of things you might have in your kitchen that your pooch can either enjoy (like some tangy pineapple slices) or that might be dangerous for your dog (avocado toast is just one toxic-for-Fido culprit). 

Keep reading to learn more, and check out our other blog that talks about some other types of foods you can share with your pup, too! 

Note: ALWAYS consult a veterinarian before feeding your dog anything other than their regular treats and kibble. Always wash fruits and vegetables that are safe for your dog BEFORE feeding. Some fruits and veggies have a coating or are treated with chemicals that could potentially harm your fluffy friend.

Can dogs eat fruits?

Can Dogs Eat Bananas: Yes, but serve moderately. 

Health Benefits

  • Low in calories.
  • High in potassium, vitamins B6 & C, biotin, fiber, and copper. 
  • Low in cholesterol and sodium. 

Serving Recommendations

Bananas are high in sugar and should only be given as an occasional snack for your pup. Large dogs can eat ½ a banana a day, and small dogs can eat two to three small pieces a day. Peels are hard to digest and may cause a blockage, so be wary. Too many banana treats might cause a stomach upset.* 

You can:

  • Mash up the banana with your dog’s kibble.
  • Mix the banana with dog-safe peanut butter.
  • Stuff the banana into a kong and freeze it. 
  • Freeze the whole banana, peel it, and slice it into bite-sized treats.

Can Dogs Eat Apples: Yes, but serve moderately. 

Health Benefits:

  • Low in calories.
  • High in vitamins C and A, potassium, antioxidants, and fiber.
  • Chewing on an apple may help clean teeth.

Serving Recommendations:

One apple has about 19 grams of sugar, so it is recommended not to feed your pup a whole apple. Peels can get stuck between your dog’s teeth, as well. Do not feed the seeds or the core of an apple to a dog as they contain a small amount of cyanide and may act as a choking hazard. It’s best to serve moderate amounts of apple to your pooch, as too much of this good thing could cause a bellyache or diarrhea.* A slice or two (thoroughly washed) is safe for dogs of all ages. Your dog can even enjoy unsweetened applesauce safely (in moderation)!

Can Dogs Eat Strawberries: Yes, but serve moderately. 

Health Benefits:

  • Low in calories.
  • High in fiber and vitamin C.
  • Full of antioxidants. 
  • May help whiten teeth.
  • May help to slow the aging process.
  • May strengthen the immune system.
  • May help with weight management.

Serving Recommendations:

With strawberries and your pup, fresh is the way to go! Avoid canned strawberries or strawberries in syrup. Wash the strawberry thoroughly and cut it into small pieces to prevent choking.* If your dog is smaller, you can try mashing the strawberry and/or berries, pureeing them, or adding them to your dog’s kibble. 

You can also:

  • Freeze the strawberry.
  • Mash the strawberry into a lick mat for mental stimulation. 

Can Dogs Eat Watermelon: Yes, but serve moderately. 

Health Benefits:

  • Low in calories.
  • High in vitamins A, B6, and C, and potassium.
  • Made of 92% water.
  • No fat or cholesterol. 

Serving Recommendations:

Seeds in watermelon can be dangerous and cause intestinal blocking, so proceed with caution and remove the seeds or purchase seedless watermelon chunks. The rind should also be removed before feeding, as it may cause gastrointestinal upset.* 

You can:

  • Slice the watermelon into chunks or small pieces.
  • Freeze the watermelon and use it as a treat for a hot day.
  • Make the watermelon into a puree and freeze in an ice cube tray.
  • Make watermelon doggy ice cream with plain, unsweetened yogurt and stuff it into a Kong toy.

Can Dogs Eat Blueberries: Yes, but serve moderately. 

Health Benefits:

  • Low in calories.
  • High in vitamin C, fiber, and phytochemicals.
  • Filled with antioxidants.
  • May help reduce the effects of brain aging. 

Serving Recommendations:

Blueberries can be a choking hazard for smaller dogs and should be fed in moderation. Because they are small, they don’t need to be sliced or cut and can be fed both frozen or fresh. All treats should make up no more than 10 percent of your dog’s daily diet.*

You can:

  • Use two or three blueberries as an occasional snack for your dog.
  • Try out our Pupgrade Digestive Chews, which include blueberry powder to support your dog’s immunity health.

Can Dogs Eat Grapes: No, this is toxic. 

Why not:

This goes for raisins, too. Grapes are highly toxic to your pooch, and even one grape or raisin can potentially be fatal. Kidney failure, abdominal pain, dehydration, lethargy, weakness, vomiting, diarrhea, and increased urine production are just a few of the possible side effects of grapes and raisins. Research has yet to pinpoint exactly what makes this food so dangerous to dogs.* 

Instead, try:

  • Our Pupgrade Multivitamin Chew as a delicious treat. This chew includes full-spectrum B vitamins to help promote overall energy and endurance, plus to support healthy body weight, as well as vitamins A, C, D, and E to help maintain strong bones and support a healthy liver, kidney, and lungs!

Can Dogs Eat Pineapple: Yes, but serve moderately. 

Health Benefits:

  • High in vitamin C, thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, vitamin B6, and folate.
  • Full of minerals like manganese, copper, potassium, magnesium, and iron.
  • Contains small amounts of calcium, phosphorus, & zinc.
  • May help with digestive health. 
  • May help with immunity support.

Serving Recommendations:

Proceed with caution when feeding this tasty, tangy fruit to your dog because it is also high in fiber and natural sugars. Large amounts can potentially lead to an upset stomach and diarrhea. Also, keep in mind that the core and spiny skin can be a choking hazard or cause obstructions.* Avoid canned pineapple and stick to the fresh, raw, sweet stuff. 

You can:

  • Slice the pineapple flesh into chunks or small pieces.
  • Peel the pineapple flesh and freeze it.

Can Dogs Eat Pumpkin: Yes, but serve moderately. 

Health Benefits: 

  • May help with skin health.
  • May help with fur/coat health/shine.
  • May help with digestive issues like constipation or diarrhea. 
  • High soluble fiber content.
  • Rich in vitamins A, C, and E. 
  • Contains minerals like iron and potassium.
  • May help support urinary health. 
  • High in antioxidants. 

Serving Recommendations: 

Experts recommend pure pumpkin for your hungry, furry family member, and also suggest being wary of canned pumpkin and never feeding pumpkin pie mix. Larger dogs can typically handle a tablespoon or two of pumpkin, while smaller dogs typically handle about a teaspoon or so per day. Veterinarians often recommend pure pumpkin to their doggy patients who might be experiencing some digestive upset because of pumpkin’s high fiber content.* 

You can:

  • Add a bit of pure pumpkin to your dog’s kibble.
  • Make a pumpkin puree.
  • Add some pumpkin to a doggy-safe recipe for a yummy treat. 
  • Try out Pupgrade Digestive Chews, which include pumpkin powder to promote relief of common digestive issues.

Can Dogs Eat Tomatoes: No, this is toxic. 

Why not:

Though your pup can usually eat ripe tomatoes in moderation as an occasional savory snack, the plant itself is a member of the nightshade veggie family. In the green parts of the tomato plant, solanine and tomatine are common toxins that can be found, so the leaves, stems, and even green tomatoes can be dangerous to your dog.* 

Can Dogs Eat Cucumbers: Yes, but serve moderately. 

Health Benefits:

  • Low in calories.
  • Very low in sodium and fat.
  • May help with weight management.
  • Is made up of about 96% water.

Serving Recommendations:

Too many cucumbers may cause gastrointestinal upset, and they can also pose a choking hazard to your pooch, so moderation and vigilance are key. It is recommended to slice up a cucumber before serving, and to follow the “10% Rule” — only 10% of your dog’s diet should be made up of treats and snacks.*

You can:

  • Slice a cucumber into small pieces.
  • Use small chunks of cucumber in a Kong toy.
  • Freeze small slices of cucumber.

Can Dogs Eat Mango: Yes, but serve moderately. 

Health Benefits:

  • Full of vitamins like A, B6, C, and E. 
  • High in fiber.

Serving Recommendations:

Check out our blog here exclusively about feeding your dog yummy mango treats, the nutrients inside mango flesh, and the possible hazards of feeding mango. 

Can Dogs Eat Oranges: Yes, but serve moderately. 

Health Benefits:

  • High in potassium and fiber.
  • Low in sodium.
  • High in vitamin C.
    May support a healthy immune system.

Serving Recommendations: 

Oranges contain sugar, so these should be given to your pooch in small amounts. Too much might cause GI upset.* The peel and seeds can also be dangerous for your dog, so make sure you peel and remove these bits to be safe.

You can:

  • Slice the orange into small pieces.
  • Cut the orange into chunks and stuff it into a Kong toy.

Can Dogs Eat Avocado: No, this is toxic. 

Why not:

Avocados might be yummy on toast, but they’re definitely not a safe snack for your doggo pal. These fruits contain persin, which is a toxin present in the flesh, pit, leaves, and actual plant. Most of this toxin is concentrated in the avocado leaves. In excess, this toxin can cause GI upset, diarrhea, vomiting, and even myocardial damage. The core seed of the avocado is also a choking hazard. Avocado also has a high fat and calorie content, which could potentially lead to pancreatitis or weight gain.*

Can dogs eat nuts?

Can Dogs Eat Almonds: Not toxic, but not recommended.

Why not:

Almonds are high in fat, which can potentially lead to pancreatitis, weight gain, or GI upset. Plus, if your dog consumes almonds it can cause symptoms like vomiting, diarrhea, gas, loss of appetite, lethargy, and general discomfort. Not to mention they can cause obstructions in your dog’s esophagus, intestinal tract, or windpipe.* 

Can Dogs Eat Cashews: Not toxic, but not recommended.

Why not:

Cashews can be risky because they are high in fat and protein. High amounts of this snack can potentially lead to pancreatitis, GI upset, or weight gain. These nuts can also cause obstructions or pose a choking hazard to your dog.* Salted cashews can also potentially lead to salt toxicity.* 

Can Dogs Eat Peanut Butter: Yes, but serve moderately.

Health Benefits:

  • Source of protein.
  • Source of healthy fats.
  • High in vitamins B and E, and niacin.

Serving Recommendations:

It is recommended to always opt for unsalted peanut butter, homemade peanut butter, or dog-safe peanut butter for your pooch. High levels of sodium, sugar, and other additives in traditional peanut butter brands can be dangerous for dogs. Too much of this treat might lead to pancreatitis or weight gain, too, so moderation is necessary. Plus, some peanut butter manufacturers have started using xylitol as a sugar substitute, which is highly toxic to your dog.* Search for pet-safe peanut butter and talk to your veterinarian first.

You can:

  • Create doggy-safe treat recipes with peanut butter.
  • Stuff some into a Kong toy for a quick and easy snack.
  • Freeze some onto a lick mat for mental stimulation. 

Can Dogs Eat Almond Butter: Yes, but serve moderately.

Health Benefits: 

  • Great source of zinc, which may support immune defenses.
  • Contains more vitamin E than peanut butter.
  • May help promote wound healing.

Serving Recommendations:

Almond butter is safe for your pooch in moderation. Large amounts can lead to GI upset and because it is high in fat content, it could potentially lead to weight gain. Almond butter can also be difficult to digest for some dogs, and flavored or sweetened nut butter (especially ones with xylitol) can pose a threat to your pooch.* 

You can:

  • Create doggy-safe treat recipes with almond butter.
  • Stuff some into a Kong toy for a quick and easy snack.
  • Freeze some onto a lick mat for mental stimulation.

Can dogs eat veggies?

Can Dogs Eat Carrots: Yes, but serve moderately.

Health Benefits:

  • Low in calories.
  • High in vitamin A, potassium, and fiber.
  • May help teething puppies with discomfort.
  • May support dental health.

Serving Recommendations:

Large, whole carrots can pose a potential choking hazard to your dog, especially smaller dogs, and should always be fed in moderation.*

You can:

  • Slice and put raw carrots into your dog’s kibble.
  • Cut a carrot into bite-size chunks.
  • Freeze a carrot, slice it into smaller pieces, and feed to your teething pup.
  • Use a large frozen carrot as a chew toy under supervision.

Can Dogs Eat Broccoli: Yes, but serve moderately.

Health Benefits:

  • Low in fat.
  • High in fiber.
  • High in vitamin C.

Serving Recommendations:

Experts contend that more than 25% of your dog’s daily intake of this leafy treat is considered toxic. The florets of the broccoli veggie also contain isothiocyanates, which can cause gastric irritation in some dogs. It might also pose a choking hazard, so smaller chunks are recommended.* Broccoli is safe for dogs either cooked or raw as long as no seasonings are added. 

What else can dogs eat?

Can Dogs Eat Grass: Proceed with caution. 

Health Benefits:

  • High fiber content.
  • May help with food digestion.
  • May help pass stool.
  • May help the GI tract if upset. 

Proceed with Caution: 

Though eating grass has been concluded by experts to be normal in domesticated dogs, it can still pose a threat.* Click here to learn more about why your dog might be consuming grass, and click here to learn some way to stop your dog from eating grass. 

Can Dogs Eat Popcorn: Yes, but serve moderately.

Health Benefits: 

  • Popped corn kernels have minerals like magnesium, phosphorus, and zinc.
  • Popped corn kernels also have some fiber and trace amounts of vitamins. 

Serving Recommendations: 

We humans can enjoy popcorn riddled with butter, salt, and oil, but this type of popcorn can be dangerous to your dog and potentially lead to GI upset or weight gain. Experts recommend popcorn that is plain and air-popped served occasionally as a small snack for your dog.* Also keep in mind that kernels can potentially get stuck in your dog’s teeth or pose a choking hazard, so whole or partially popped kernels might be best kept away from your furry friend.

Can Dogs Eat Shrimp: Yes, but serve moderately.

Health Benefits: 

  • High in vitamin B12, niacin, and phosphorus.
  • High in antioxidants. 
  • Low in fat, calories, and carbs.
  • May help with gastrointestinal health.
  • May help with metabolic processes.
  • May help with energy production.
  • May help reduce brain aging.

Serving Recommendations:

Though this small fishy treat has a truckload of possible benefits, they are high in cholesterol, so too many can potentially lead to unhealthy levels of cholesterol in your dog’s diet. Raw, uncooked shrimp also contain harmful microbes that may hurt your dog, and shrimp shells can be a choking and/or obstruction hazard. Experts say steamed shrimp is best the option for hungry pooches.* 

You can: 

  • Remove the shell and steam/cook the shrimp and give as an occasional treat.
  • Add one or two to your dog’s kibble.

 

Disclaimer: Consult with your dog’s vet before making any significant changes to their diet. Ask your vet if your dog has any history of allergies or needs an allergy test. Better to be safe than sorry!

Which foods from your kitchen does your pooch love to snack on?

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Resources:

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  2. Copeland, K. (2022, January 13). 18 fruits & vegetables dogs can eat (with infographic). Pet Keen. Retrieved from https://petkeen.com/fruits-vegetables-dogs-can-eat/.  
  3. Ellen Malmanger, D. V. M. (2021, August 24). Which fruits can dogs eat? PetMD. Retrieved from https://www.petmd.com/dog/nutrition/evr_multi_healthy_snacks.  
  4. Richard Walther, D. V. M. (2021, June 29). What Fruits can dogs eat? A list of Good & Bad Fruits for Dogs. Pawlicy Advisor. Retrieved from https://www.pawlicy.com/blog/fruits-dogs-can-and-cant-eat/.  
  5. 39 vegetables and fruits dogs can eat and can't eat. Pupford. (2022, April 4). Retrieved from https://pupford.com/vegetables-fruits-dogs-can-cant-eat/.  
  6. Burke, A. (2018, March 19). Can dogs eat nuts? American Kennel Club. Retrieved from https://www.akc.org/expert-advice/nutrition/can-dogs-eat-nuts/
  7. Lezzi, T., Dunn, L., & Zeller, J. (2021, April 28). Can dogs eat nuts? The Farmer's Dog. Retrieved from https://www.thefarmersdog.com/digest/can-dog-eat-nuts/.  
  8. Burke, A. (2018, August 14). Can dogs eat almonds? American Kennel Club. Retrieved from https://www.akc.org/expert-advice/nutrition/can-dogs-eat-almonds/
  9. Burke, A. (2018, March 19). Can dogs eat popcorn? American Kennel Club. Retrieved from https://www.akc.org/expert-advice/nutrition/can-dogs-eat-popcorn/.  
  10. Staff, A. K. C. (2021, December 26). Why dogs eat poop and how to stop it. American Kennel Club. Retrieved from https://www.akc.org/expert-advice/health/why-dogs-eat-poop/.  
  11. Meyers, H. (2022, March 8). Why does my dog eat grass? American Kennel Club. Retrieved from https://www.akc.org/expert-advice/advice/why-does-my-dog-eat-grass/.  
  12. Burke, A. (2020, March 10). Can dogs eat shrimp? American Kennel Club. Retrieved from https://www.akc.org/expert-advice/nutrition/can-dogs-eat-shrimp/.  
  13. Staff, A. K. C. (2022, April 3). Foods your dog should never eat. American Kennel Club. Retrieved from https://www.akc.org/expert-advice/nutrition/human-foods-dogs-can-and-cant-eat/.  
  14. Elliott, B. (2017, December 14). Can my dog eat this? A list of human foods dogs can and can't eat. Healthline. Retrieved from https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/human-foods-for-dogs.  
  15. Benefits of pumpkin for your dog. East Side Animal Hospital. (2019, April 26). Retrieved from https://eahpet.com/2019/04/26/benefits-of-pumpkin-for-your-dog/.  
  16. Stone, K. (2020, December 20). Can dogs eat almond butter? Lively Paws. Retrieved from https://livelypaws.com/blogs/news/can-dogs-eat-almond-butter#.